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Lifecall’s Personal Medical Alarms

By | Uncategorized

MEDICALALARM204Senior safety is an important yet often overlooked issue. For many, the idea of leaving their aging parent, family member or friend alone in their home is a frightful thought. The risk of falls, injuries and medical complications increases as we grow older. Lifecall’s personal medical alarms were devised to provide an unobtrusive yet effective solution to this issue, while allowing older adults to retain a sense of independence.

One of the most difficult psychological obstacles to overcome as we age is the loss of independence. With increased age comes an increased need for support and supervision. For many people, it is unsafe for them to remain alone in their home for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, caregivers can typically allot only a certain amount of time to their patients, and 24-hour supervision is far from affordable for most.

Lifecall’s personal medical alarms offer a perfect solution: discreet and affordable 24-hour supervision that allows seniors to retain complete control over their lives. At Lifecall we install our products across the entire United States. We also ship our devices with instructions for easy self-installation at a discounted price. In either case, we offer personalized, round-the-clock service, guaranteed to keep you connected to emergency services whenever needed.

Installation and maintenance of our units is simple. Simply connect the device to a phone line and plug it into a standard outlet. Built with an internal rechargeable battery, the unit will remain active for many hours in the case of a power outage. Additionally, if there is any malfunction, the lights on the device will begin blinking. Simply contact us directly via phone or email if you have any additional questions or concerns regarding our personal medical alarms.

Medical Alert Systems

By | Uncategorized

MEDICALALERT201Disabled individuals are at a greater risk for harm than most. To that end, many of them often need constant supervision to ensure their safety. Nevertheless, this can be frustrating for both the patient and the caregiver. The first is required to give up a great deal of their independence, while the latter is required to spend much of their personal time caring for another.

The simple installation of our Medical Alert Systems can instantly provide a great deal of freedom to an older adult in and around their home. These small units connect directly to a phone line, and allow for communication with emergency services whenever necessary. Caregivers can now leave their patients without having to worry what could happen to them when alone.

At Lifecall, we believe that medical alarm systems should be easy to use and require very little maintenance. Our Two Way Voice Unit, for example, requires only the press of one button to communicate with our 24-hour emergency response center. Equipped with the portable transmitter, owners of these units can feel safe no matter where they are located within their home.

Our units are “smart machines.” If they are ever unplugged from the outlet, the emergency response center is notified. If there is a power outage, the internal battery will ensure it remains functional for many hours. If it has a malfunction, the lights on the device will begin blinking. As a family owned business, we understand the importance of keeping loved ones safe. That is why both our products and our service have been designed for maximum efficiency and ease of use.

How To Convince Your Parents To Get A Medical Alert System

By | Aging in Place, Blog | No Comments

Let’s face it. It’s not easy sometimes to convince your elderly parents that you’d like them to have a little added insurance and protection around the home.

A lot of adult children make the mistake of forcing their parents to get a medical alert system. This is probably the worst thing you can do!

Remember Grumpy Grandpa is a very strong, healthy and independent senior. He likes to stay active. He’s the kind of person who does everything by himself. He changes his own oil, loves to fish and even does chair yoga.

Instead of forcing the idea, here are a few tips that have worked for our customers.

  • Strategy 1: It’s not for you, it’s for me
    This is by far the best strategy . Just tell your parents that even though you know that they are healthy and probably would never use the system, you and your siblings would feel better knowing that mom and dad had a backup plan.
  • Strategy 2: Keep it simple
    Seniors hate things that are complicated. In fact, most of us will never read manuals or buy anything that isn’t easy to use.
    Although they don’t look as good as an iPhone or iPad, medical alert systems are just as easy to use and install. Tell your parents that all that’s required to install is to plug in a power cable and a phone cord. To call for help, all you have to do is push a button and an operator will come over the speakerphone.

Here are some things you should avoid:

1.   Scaring them
Those “fallen and can’t get up” commercials on TV get a little old. Images of seniors lying on the ground or injured aren’t very appealing. It’s probably not the best idea to use scare tactics on your parents or loved ones.

2.  Statistics
As you get older, your chances of falling increase. Everyone knows this, including your elderly parents. Don’t remind them. Fall statistics are usually the wrong way to go about trying to convince someone to buy a medical alert system.

3.  Sending brochures to their house or giving out their contact information – without them knowing.
Don’t upset people, so please tell your parents to expect that information is going to be sent to them before putting their names on any online information or free brochure request form.

So there’s our list of do’s and don’ts. Try these out and let us know how they worked for you and your family.

LifeCall Fall Alert Systems

Contact FallAlert Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes. www.lifecall.com

Betting On Longevity

By | Blog, Genetics | No Comments

How old is old?

A new U.S. Census report suggests that 90-plus is a better definition of the “oldest old” instead of the now common definition of 85-plus. That’s because this segment of the population is exploding.

From 1980 to 2010, the number of Americans 90 and over almost tripled to 1.9 million. It’s projected to more than quadruple by 2050, compared to a doubling of the population aged 65 to 89.

The New York Times explores what it takes to reach these ripe old ages, who ages well and why,  and the science of aging.
The articles are online at nytimes.com/aging.

Here are summaries of some of the articles:

1) Old but Not Frail: A Matter of Heart and Head

It is one of the persistent mysteries of aging. Why would one person remain so hale and hearty while another, who had seemed just as healthy, start to weaken and slow down, sometimes as early as his 70’s?

Now scientists are surprised to find that, in many cases, a single factor — undetected cardiovascular disease — is often a major reason people become frail.

A second finding is just as surprising. Rigorous studies are now showing that seeing, or hearing, gloomy predictions about what it is like to be old can make people walk more  slowly, hear and remember less well, and even affect their cardiovascular systems. Positive images of aging have the opposite effects.

The constant message that old people are expected to be slow and weak and forgetful is not a reason for the full-blown frailty syndrome. But it may help push people along that path.

Overcoming Stereotypes
It turns out that people who have more positive views about aging are healthier over time, according to a Ohio study.  They lived an average of 7.6 years longer than those of a similar age who did not hold such views, and even had less hearing loss when their hearing was tested three years after the study began. The result persisted when the investigators took in account the participants’ health at the start of the study, as well as their age, gender, and socioeconomic status.

Read more

2) Live Long? Die Young? Answer Isn’t Just in Genes.

Recent studies find that genes may not be that important in determining how long someone will live and whether a person will get some diseases. That means it is generally impossible to predict how long a person will live based on how long the person’s relatives lived.

Life spans are not a trait like height, which is strongly inherited.

Among the chronic diseases of the elderly, Parkinson’s and heart disease have no detectable hereditary component, studies repeatedly find.

A strong family history of even a genetically linked disease does not guarantee a person will get it, and having no family history does not mean a person is protected. Instead, chronic diseases strike almost at random among the elderly, making it perhaps not so surprising that life spans themselves have such a weak genetic link.

Read More

The Genetics of Aging
The Genetics of Aging – VIDEO
Scientists are trying to determine whether genes can account for the exceptional health and longevity of 92-year-old twin Josephine Tesauro.

 

 

 

 

 

LifeCall Fall Alert Systems

Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes. www.lifecall.com

The Older But Wiser Brain

By | Aging Brain, Blog | No Comments

It’s not all bad news! Yes, it’s true our reaction time is slower and it takes us longer to retrieve information … BUT we are more shrewd 🙂  In other words, our complex reasoning skills improve. We’re able to anticipate problems and reason things out better than when we were young.

And, there’s another area of improvement as we age: empathy — the ability to understand the emotional point of view of another. Empathy increases as we age.

One of the great discoveries from recent neuroscience research is that the human brain is always changing, from moment to moment and throughout life. It continues to develop, and even continues to grow new brain cells.

Physical Fitness Helps
Art Kramer, a neuroscientist from the University of Illinois has found that memory can improve with treadmill workouts. He writes that after treadmill training, MRI scans of his elderly test subjects revealed larger hippocampi and other brain regions .

Also Important!

  1. Eat right – Many foods, including nuts, fish and red wine, have been linked to a healthy brain. But concentrating on an all-around healthy diet may be the best nutritional strategy for keeping the brain sharp. And don’t skip breakfast!
  2. Good posture – Maintaining an upright, un-slouched posture improves circulation and blood-flow to the brain.
  3. Sleep well – A good night’s sleep is vitally important to a healthy mind, especially memory. Get enough sleep and take naps.
  4. Paint, draw, or doodle – Whether it’s a masterpiece or a mere doodle, simply making a picture is an excellent workout for the brain.
  5. Listen to music – Music affects the brain profoundly, and has been linked to improved cognition and memory functioning.
  6. Learn something new – Many colleges and senior centers offer engaging, low-cost lectures and classes for older adults. Ongoing education is a surefire way to keep sharp.
  7. Do puzzles – When you challenge and stimulate yourself intellectually, you exercise your brain and increase your mental capacity. Crosswords are a popular choice.
  8. Write – Writing improves working memory and your ability to communicate.

Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors
and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

Inspired Living @ 90!

By | Blog, Inspiration | No Comments

Stir in some Optimism, add a pinch of Curiosity, dowse in Humor.

She is a pioneer in a place few people have been. The far side of 90!

A long-lived lady in South Florida, a former writer and teacher, 93-year-old Esther has laid down her recipe for inspirational aging. Here are her secrets:

  • Find companionship. Loneliness is a huge problem in old age.  Make an extra effort to find friends through a senior center, library group or religious organization.
  • Exercise your body every day.
  • Use your brain.
  • Keep your sense of humor. At this age, life is tenuous and you can afford to laugh!
  • Dress well every day. No frayed pants or frumpy house dresses allowed. Dress as if you had a date. When you get a compliment, it makes you feel distinctive.
  • Find a theme song. Make it something cheerful.  Use it to smooth the soul when you see or hear something unpleasant!
  • Leave the door open for love. Love can happen even more intensely at this age because you know your life is shortened.
  • Offer a cheerful greeting. Never ask “how are you?”  Start out with a compliment about a women’s scarf or tell a man how handsome he looks today. Resolve never to discuss health issues in public.
  • Have a conversation starter. Stay current on the news and have a short list of topics to talk about when you see people.
  • Plan your day, every day. You can have a fuller life than when you were younger because your time is your own now.

Led by advances in medicine, the number of Americans living to 90 and beyond has tripled since 1980 and will quadruple by 2050.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

Playing The Odds On Long-Term Care

By | Blog, Long Term Care Insurance | No Comments

Long-term care insurance is a little like cod liver oil. Everyone tells you it’s good for you but paying all those premiums can be hard to swallow.

LTC insurance can protect your assets — and your peace of mind. One look at the cost of a nursing home — an average of about $61,320 annually — and it’s easy to see why the number of people buying LTC policies has increased dramatically.  Policies cover extended care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult day care centers, and even your home. A good policy also covers all types of care, not just skilled medical care but help with daily activities if you become chronically ill or disabled.

But LTC insurance doesn’t come cheap. Here’s what you need to know before you buy.

Who needs it
Whether a policy makes sense for you depends on several factors: your net worth, how much of it you’re willing to spend on healthcare, how much want to leave to heirs, your marital status, and your age.

Consider your family history, too. If longevity or a chronic disease runs in your family, you may be more likely to require long-term care at some point. And because women live longer than men on average, they are more likely to need nursing home or other extended care.

The idea is to buy a policy before you need one. The older you get, the greater the risk that you may develop health problems and become uninsurable. Even if you do get a policy, premiums will be steep. That’s why most financial planners suggest clients buy a policy by their mid-50s or early 60s.

In general, the richer you are the less you need a policy, and the poorer you are the more likely it is that you’ll qualify for Medicaid.  Between those poles, things get murky.

When it comes to long-term care insurance, you money pays for it
… but YOUR HEALTH buys it!

Long-term care insurance premiums are based on your age and the condition of your health when you purchase a policy. Assume a person is in good health. Consider that the average nursing home stay is 2½ to 3 years.

It may sound obvious, but make sure you buy a policy you can afford. Remember you are going to pay those premiums for years to come. If they’re too expensive, you may let your policy lapse and will have wasted thousands of dollars.  A good rule of thumb: make sure a premium does not exceed 5 percent of your current income.

Here are findings from the 2011 Long-Term Care Insurance Price Index:
Average price for a comprehensive long-term care insurance policy (100% home care benefit + skilled care coverage), 90-Day Elimination Period with Compound Inflation Protection Option (benefit increases 5% compounded annually).  The average of rates from selected leading insurers.

Age 55 – Single Individual
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $169,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $305,000
Cost: $1,480-per-year
Low Cost: $1,325
High Cost: $2,550
Individual Qualifies for Preferred Health and Spousal Discounts

Age 55 – Couple (both age 55 – Preferred Health – Shared Policy)
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $338,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $610,000
Cost: $2,350-per-year
Low Cost: $2,085
High Cost: $3,970
Individual Qualifies for Preferred Health and Spousal Discounts, Includes Shared Care Option

Age 55 – Couple (both age 55 – Standard Health)
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $338,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $610,000
Cost: $2,405-per-year
Low Cost: $1,985
High Cost: $3,970
Individual Qualifies for Standard Health and Spousal Discounts

Age 60 – Couple (both age 60- Preferred Health – Shared Policy)
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $338,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $527,300
Cost: $2,970-per-year
Low Cost: $2,605
High Cost: $4,935
Individual Qualifies for Preferred Health and Spousal Discounts, Includes Shared Care Option

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

Tips For Boosting Vitality

By | Blog, Healthy Aging | No Comments

Don’t fall for the myth that aging automatically means you’re not going to feel well anymore.  Not all illness or pain is avoidable, but many of the physical challenges associated with aging can be greatly lessened by eating right, exercising, and taking care of yourself.

It’s never too late to start!  No matter how old you are or how unhealthy you’ve been in the past, caring for your body has enormous benefits that will help you stay active, sharpen your memory, boost your immune system, manage health problems, and increase your energy.

Eating well is more important than ever
As you age, your relationship to food changes along with your body.  A decreased metabolism, changes in taste and smell, and slower digestion may affect your appetite, the foods you can eat, and how your body processes food. The key is to figure out how to adapt to your changing needs.

Load up on high-fiber fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.  Your whole digestive system is slower, so fiber is very important. Consume fiber-rich foods such as whole grains, fruit, and vegetables.  They will help you feel more energetic and give you fuel to keep going.

Put effort into making your food look and taste good. Your taste buds aren’t as strong and your appetite may not be the same, but your nutritional needs are just as important as ever.

Watch out for dehydration.  Make sure you are drinking plenty of fluid, even if you don’t feel thirsty. If you’re not getting enough water, you’re not going to be as sharp and your energy will suffer.

Make meals a social event. It’s more enjoyable to eat with others than alone. Invite people over. You can share cooking and cleanup duties.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors
and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

Is A Personal Medical Alarm Right For You?

By | Blog, Personal Medical Alarms | No Comments

If you fell and couldn’t get up, could you get help? Maybe a Personal Medical Alarm is right for you.

Though experts agree that a wearable alarm system may not help in all situations or be appropriate for all elderly people, it could be lifesaving for some.

It’s estimated that one-third of elderly people living at home and two-thirds of those living in assisted living facilities fall each year. These mishaps result directly in about 1,800 deaths and contribute to at least 9,500 fatalities.

For many people, a personal medical alarm can be lifesavers. Whether the alarm is right for the individual depends partially on their mental and physical conditions and those of their caregivers.

So is a transportable alarm right for you or an elderly relative? To make that decision, you will have to consider the lifestyle of the person, their physical and mental abilities, the cost of the service, and what it provides.

The LifeCall Medical Alert System is priced as low as $27.45 a month, with no long term contracts. This complete and easy-to-operate emergency monitoring program means you will receive experienced, professional help from certified Emergency Medical Technicians when you need it.

Exercise is the key
Exercise is one of the most important ways to prevent falls. Exercise builds muscle strength and stamina, which help improve coordination and balance. Even people who have a lot of frailty can benefit from exercise in general. It can be argued that inactivity is the third leading cause of death in the elderly.

Other advice from experts includes:

  • You should talk with your doctor about whether certain medications or medical conditions, including your vision and hearing, may be causing you to stumble or fall.
  • Check for stairs and railings that may be in disrepair and carpets that may have loose seams.
  • Get rid of throw rugs.
  • Add grab bars to your bathroom.
  • Don’t sit on furniture that is so low that it’s difficult to sit down or get up.
  • Wear shoes that are comfortable and fit properly.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

 

Choosing A Nursing Home

By | Blog, Nursing Homes | No Comments

The decision is one of the hardest you will ever make. Your spouse, parent or another family member needs care that assisted living or home health care simply cannot provide. You need to choose a nursing home.

It’s a difficult and emotional task. The horror stories are well documented. Finding a good nursing home takes research and perseverance. You want a safe, engaging and pleasant environment with caring staff and solid medical practices.

Not to mention paying for a nursing home … another huge source of stress.

Medicare pays only for medically necessary care in a skilled nursing home, like physical therapy or intravenous medicine. It does not pay for custodial care — help with walking, eating, bathing and other daily tasks. Result? The majority of nursing home residents pay from personal money, long-term care insurance policies or, if they qualify, through Medicaid.

Unfortunately, the typical search for a nursing home is made under duress. Most admissions come from hospitals. The hospital is in a hurry to discharge and may move quickly to get the patient moved to an available nursing home bed, regardless of the nursing home’s quality or reputation.

The average cost of nursing home care is $200 a day, and that does not include additional fees for specialized services like care for patients with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Start With The Data
Every year the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services collect data on more than 15,000 nursing homes throughout the country. Health inspection data, staffing and quality measures are combined to come up with an overall ranking of one to five stars.

To look up nursing homes in your area, go to medicare.gov and click on the Nursing Home Compare Tool.

The site offers a useful brochure entitled Medicare’s Guide to Choosing a Nursing Home.

Visit, Then Visit Again
Nothing substitutes for what you see, hear and smell when you visit a nursing home. Be sure to visit more than once and at different times of the day and different days of the week. Be sure to take the Nursing Home Checklist with you!

Call Your Ombudsman
Each state has a federally funded long-term care ombudsman who is an advocate for nursing home patients.

This person can tell you if there are state rankings or surveys available in addition to the Medicare ratings. The ombudsman can also help you find the latest health inspection reports,
which are public information, on specific nursing homes. Ombudsmen can also tell you how many complaints the office has collected about a specific nursing home and the nature of those complaints.

You can find the ombudsman in your state online at the National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.