Monthly Archives

May 2012

Inspired Living @ 90!

By | Blog, Inspiration | No Comments

Stir in some Optimism, add a pinch of Curiosity, dowse in Humor.

She is a pioneer in a place few people have been. The far side of 90!

A long-lived lady in South Florida, a former writer and teacher, 93-year-old Esther has laid down her recipe for inspirational aging. Here are her secrets:

  • Find companionship. Loneliness is a huge problem in old age.  Make an extra effort to find friends through a senior center, library group or religious organization.
  • Exercise your body every day.
  • Use your brain.
  • Keep your sense of humor. At this age, life is tenuous and you can afford to laugh!
  • Dress well every day. No frayed pants or frumpy house dresses allowed. Dress as if you had a date. When you get a compliment, it makes you feel distinctive.
  • Find a theme song. Make it something cheerful.  Use it to smooth the soul when you see or hear something unpleasant!
  • Leave the door open for love. Love can happen even more intensely at this age because you know your life is shortened.
  • Offer a cheerful greeting. Never ask “how are you?”  Start out with a compliment about a women’s scarf or tell a man how handsome he looks today. Resolve never to discuss health issues in public.
  • Have a conversation starter. Stay current on the news and have a short list of topics to talk about when you see people.
  • Plan your day, every day. You can have a fuller life than when you were younger because your time is your own now.

Led by advances in medicine, the number of Americans living to 90 and beyond has tripled since 1980 and will quadruple by 2050.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

Playing The Odds On Long-Term Care

By | Blog, Long Term Care Insurance | No Comments

Long-term care insurance is a little like cod liver oil. Everyone tells you it’s good for you but paying all those premiums can be hard to swallow.

LTC insurance can protect your assets — and your peace of mind. One look at the cost of a nursing home — an average of about $61,320 annually — and it’s easy to see why the number of people buying LTC policies has increased dramatically.  Policies cover extended care in nursing homes, assisted living facilities, adult day care centers, and even your home. A good policy also covers all types of care, not just skilled medical care but help with daily activities if you become chronically ill or disabled.

But LTC insurance doesn’t come cheap. Here’s what you need to know before you buy.

Who needs it
Whether a policy makes sense for you depends on several factors: your net worth, how much of it you’re willing to spend on healthcare, how much want to leave to heirs, your marital status, and your age.

Consider your family history, too. If longevity or a chronic disease runs in your family, you may be more likely to require long-term care at some point. And because women live longer than men on average, they are more likely to need nursing home or other extended care.

The idea is to buy a policy before you need one. The older you get, the greater the risk that you may develop health problems and become uninsurable. Even if you do get a policy, premiums will be steep. That’s why most financial planners suggest clients buy a policy by their mid-50s or early 60s.

In general, the richer you are the less you need a policy, and the poorer you are the more likely it is that you’ll qualify for Medicaid.  Between those poles, things get murky.

When it comes to long-term care insurance, you money pays for it
… but YOUR HEALTH buys it!

Long-term care insurance premiums are based on your age and the condition of your health when you purchase a policy. Assume a person is in good health. Consider that the average nursing home stay is 2½ to 3 years.

It may sound obvious, but make sure you buy a policy you can afford. Remember you are going to pay those premiums for years to come. If they’re too expensive, you may let your policy lapse and will have wasted thousands of dollars.  A good rule of thumb: make sure a premium does not exceed 5 percent of your current income.

Here are findings from the 2011 Long-Term Care Insurance Price Index:
Average price for a comprehensive long-term care insurance policy (100% home care benefit + skilled care coverage), 90-Day Elimination Period with Compound Inflation Protection Option (benefit increases 5% compounded annually).  The average of rates from selected leading insurers.

Age 55 – Single Individual
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $169,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $305,000
Cost: $1,480-per-year
Low Cost: $1,325
High Cost: $2,550
Individual Qualifies for Preferred Health and Spousal Discounts

Age 55 – Couple (both age 55 – Preferred Health – Shared Policy)
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $338,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $610,000
Cost: $2,350-per-year
Low Cost: $2,085
High Cost: $3,970
Individual Qualifies for Preferred Health and Spousal Discounts, Includes Shared Care Option

Age 55 – Couple (both age 55 – Standard Health)
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $338,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $610,000
Cost: $2,405-per-year
Low Cost: $1,985
High Cost: $3,970
Individual Qualifies for Standard Health and Spousal Discounts

Age 60 – Couple (both age 60- Preferred Health – Shared Policy)
$150 Maximum Daily Benefit x 3 Year Benefit Period
Current Value of Benefits: $338,000 — Value of Benefits at age 75: $527,300
Cost: $2,970-per-year
Low Cost: $2,605
High Cost: $4,935
Individual Qualifies for Preferred Health and Spousal Discounts, Includes Shared Care Option

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.

Tips For Boosting Vitality

By | Blog, Healthy Aging | No Comments

Don’t fall for the myth that aging automatically means you’re not going to feel well anymore.  Not all illness or pain is avoidable, but many of the physical challenges associated with aging can be greatly lessened by eating right, exercising, and taking care of yourself.

It’s never too late to start!  No matter how old you are or how unhealthy you’ve been in the past, caring for your body has enormous benefits that will help you stay active, sharpen your memory, boost your immune system, manage health problems, and increase your energy.

Eating well is more important than ever
As you age, your relationship to food changes along with your body.  A decreased metabolism, changes in taste and smell, and slower digestion may affect your appetite, the foods you can eat, and how your body processes food. The key is to figure out how to adapt to your changing needs.

Load up on high-fiber fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.  Your whole digestive system is slower, so fiber is very important. Consume fiber-rich foods such as whole grains, fruit, and vegetables.  They will help you feel more energetic and give you fuel to keep going.

Put effort into making your food look and taste good. Your taste buds aren’t as strong and your appetite may not be the same, but your nutritional needs are just as important as ever.

Watch out for dehydration.  Make sure you are drinking plenty of fluid, even if you don’t feel thirsty. If you’re not getting enough water, you’re not going to be as sharp and your energy will suffer.

Make meals a social event. It’s more enjoyable to eat with others than alone. Invite people over. You can share cooking and cleanup duties.

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Contact LifeCall Medical Alert Systems, one of the leading providers of BOSCH in-home health care monitoring solutions for seniors
and at-risk persons seeking to retain their independence and remain in their own homes.